BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Somali Swahili French Great Lakes Hausa Portugeuse
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Africa  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Wednesday, 27 November, 2002, 16:42 GMT
Food shortages hit Somali peace talks
Somali peace delegates
Delegates had also complained about the food quality
The Somali peace talks, which have made little progress since they opened in the Kenyan town of Eldoret six weeks ago, are jeopardised by a row between the hotel where they are staying and the Kenyan authorities.


The poor people of Somalia do not miss meals for as long as we have been missing meals in Eldoret

Somali delegate
The 800 delegates have not been provided with any food since Tuesday morning, and some have threatened to walk out.

The hotel says the Kenyan Government, which is responsible for organising accommodation for the delegates, has not paid for their food for two weeks.

Delegates now say they have seen food being prepared for Wednesday's evening meal, when they break the fast they observe during the holy month of Ramadan.

A European Union official told the BBC that the Kenyan Government has obtained funds from a donor other than the EU, the United States and the Arab League, who have been financing the talks.

Donors had originally planned for 350 delegates and the talks have recently been bogged down on attempts to reduce numbers.

'Accounting problems'

The Kenyan envoy to Somalia, Elijah Mwangale, who also chairs the peace talks, told the BBC that the hotel has been asking for 40m Kenyan shillings ($500,000) although, he says, it was given 10m shillings only last week.

The Kenyan Government has been paying the hotel fornightly for the delegates' stay.

Mogadishu
The transitional government has little control outside Mogadishu

Their upkeep costs $8,000 a day, with 800 delegates being accomodated and fed at a rate of $100 per day.

The EU official says the problem revolves mainly around an accounting problem with the Kenyan Government.

He says it has not given the right figures about the delegates' expenses, and the EU has delayed its payments.

The delegates have said that they will continue the talks once food is available.

But some, such as the delegation from Puntland, have said they want to go home.

"The poor people of Somalia do not miss meals for as long as we have been missing meals in Eldoret," a delegate told the BBC.

The delegates, whose meals include a lot of rice, spaghetti and milk at home, have had to get used to a different diet in Eldoret, and the BBC's Mohammed Adow in Nairobi says that there have been complaints about the food since the talks started.


Politics

Terrorist haven?

RESOURCES
See also:

24 Oct 02 | Africa
16 Oct 02 | Africa
24 Dec 01 | Africa
12 Mar 02 | Country profiles
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Africa stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Africa stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes