BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Somali Swahili French Great Lakes Hausa Portugeuse
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Africa  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Friday, 15 November, 2002, 12:40 GMT
'One in seven Kenyan voters is dead'
Opposition rally in Nairobi
The opposition is tipped to do well this time
An unofficial audit of Kenya's electoral roll shows that nearly 16% of registered voters are dead.

The BBC's Ishbel Matheson in Nairobi says the survey raises fears of vote-rigging just six weeks ahead of Kenya's keenly awaited general elections.


In the past two elections, some dead voters' cards were used fraudulently.

Ishbel Matheson, BBC, Nairobi
The Electoral Commission of Kenya accepts that the names of voters who have died since 1997 have not been erased but says the figure of 16% is an exaggeration.

The elections are set for 27 December and will lead to a new president, as Daniel arap Moi is not allowed to stand for re-election.

His nomination of Uhuru Kenyatta, son of Kenya's founding president, as the candidate of the ruling Kanu party has led to mass defections.

Some former ministers have joined the opposition to form the National Rainbow Coalition (Narc) led by Mwai Kibaki.

Correspondents say Narc now stands a good chance of breaking Kanu's unbroken 40-year grip on power.

Angry, live voters

The study by the Institute of Education in Democracy (IED) found that an estimated 1.5 million people on the electoral roll of 10.4 million had died.

The audit was based on a survey of 19 out of Kenya's 210 constituencies, spread across the country.

Uhuru Kenyatta
Kenyatta's nomination split the ruling party

But the Electoral Commission's Chairman, Samuel Kivuitu, says this figure is far too high.

He does, however, acknowledge a problem, saying that attempts to remove the names of dead people from the roll had to be abandoned.

The provincial administration mistakenly passed on the names of people still alive for removal from the electoral roll.

Officials were confronted by angry voters, who insisted they were alive and wanted to cast their ballots.

Our correspondent says that in the past two elections, some dead voters' cards were used fraudulently.

But this time, voting will be carried out in each polling station, instead of centrally, and the IED says that this should reduce the scope for electoral fraud.

Kenyans choose a new president

Key stories

Inauguration day

Moi steps down

Background

INTERACTIVE GUIDE

AUDIO VIDEO

TALKING POINT
See also:

12 Nov 02 | Africa
25 Oct 02 | Africa
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Africa stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Africa stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes