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Thursday, 24 October, 2002, 12:26 GMT 13:26 UK
New start for Kenya's ruling party
Uhuru Kenyatta (left)
Uhuru (left) is trying to distance himself from Moi

The man President Daniel arap Moi wants to replace him as Kenya's leader later this year has been unveiling his political vision in Nairobi.

Kenya's elections
Presidential and parliamentary vote
Due by end of year
Kanu candidate - Uhuru Kenyatta
Opposition Narc candidate - Mwai Kibaki
The son of Kenya's first president, Uhuru Kenyatta, said he represented a new generation determined to tackle the country's deepening poverty and its reputation for corruption.

But although he sought to distance himself from his mentor, he also implied that he wanted an amnesty for those accused of corruption under Mr Moi's government.

New start

The 41-year-old has been trying hard to shake off his image as a political puppet and novice - a man plucked from obscurity by President Moi and thrust, blinking, into the limelight.

veteran Mwai Kibaki (left)
Uhuru will face veteran Mwai Kibaki leading a broad opposition alliance
And speaking at a Nairobi hotel, Mr Kenyatta criticised the legacy of 24 years in power.

"Kenya is faced with a number critical challenges including high poverty levels, serious unemployment, crippling domestic debt, poor infrastructure and failing institutions," he said.

Mr Kenyatta said he represented a new beginning for Kenya and insisted that the ruling Kanu party is taking steps to deal with its vices - a reference to the allegations of corruption which have built up over almost four decades in power.

Drawing a line

Mr Kenyatta comes from Kenya's biggest tribe - the Kikuyu - and with the help of the state apparatus and Kanu's grass roots structures, he is likely to be a formidable candidate.

But his opponents say he has been brought in to protect a corrupt elite which fears prosecution under a new government.

When asked if there should be an amnesty for those accused of corruption, he said: "There are some areas in which we have definitely not taken the right path, or not followed the right path. And I would like to see us be able to say ok, lets now draw a line."

A message then of reconciliation, forgiveness and reform. A plan to breathe new life into Kenya's ruling party.

President Moi is widely expected to dissolve parliament at any moment and call for elections in December.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
Mwai Kibaki on BBC Network Africa
"There's no way we can fall apart"
 VOTE RESULTS
Is Kenyatta the right man to replace Moi?

Yes
 22.50% 

No
 77.50% 

13816 Votes Cast

Results are indicative and may not reflect public opinion

Kenyans choose a new president

Key stories

Inauguration day

Moi steps down

Background

INTERACTIVE GUIDE

AUDIO VIDEO

TALKING POINT
See also:

10 Oct 02 | Africa
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