BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Somali Swahili French Great Lakes Hausa Portugeuse
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Africa  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Friday, 18 October, 2002, 15:17 GMT 16:17 UK
Kenyan ministers linked to clashes
Uhuru Kenyatta is hoping to replace Moi as president
A report has recommended that prominent current and former Kenyan ministers be investigated for their alleged roles in tribal clashes.

The clashes took place in the run-up to elections in 1992 and 1997 and left thousands dead.

The report was submitted to the government in 1999, but only released on Friday after a court ordered the government to make its findings public.

The judicial report names current ministers: Nicholas Biwott, Julius Sunkuli and Maalim Mohamed.

It also names four former ministers, including William ole Ntimama, who resigned last week to join the opposition National Rainbow Coalition, as among those who should be investigated.

Political cleansing

Government critics say that the clashes were organised by powerful individuals to force opposition supporters to flee constituencies where the ruling Kanu party faced close election contests.

Senior officials in the provincial administration and the police force have also been mentioned as having either incited people to violence, or turned a blind eye when the violence erupted.

Mwai Kibaki
Kibaki lost to Moi in 1997

Hundreds of thousands of people fled their homes in Rift Valley, Central and Western Kenya and on the coast.

Launching the report compiled by a commission headed by Justice Akilano Akiwumi, Attorney General Amos Wako insisted that people mentioned in the report should not be presumed guilty, until a court of law ruled that they were indeed guilty.

He told reporters that 11 years after what was then referred to as ethnic cleansing started, investigations were still continuing.

Unified opposition

Kanu won the 1992 and 1997 elections, but could face a close fight this time after mass defections from the ruling party to the opposition.

President Moi has ruled Kenya for 24 years but is now required to stand down.

His choice as successor, Uhuru Kenyatta, will be the ruling party's candidate.

Elections are expected in December.

The opposition are in negotiations with Kanu defectors seeking to agree on a single candidate to run for president.

They have already agreed on one candidate for each of the parliamentary seats.

Mr Wako says there is no likelihood of tribal clashes erupting before this year's elections, however our reporter in Nairobi says the report is bound to slightly distract Kenyans from their passioned debate on who will be the country's next president.

 VOTE RESULTS
Is Kenyatta the right man to replace Moi?

Yes
 22.50% 

No
 77.50% 

13816 Votes Cast

Results are indicative and may not reflect public opinion

Kenyans choose a new president

Key stories

Inauguration day

Moi steps down

Background

INTERACTIVE GUIDE

AUDIO VIDEO

TALKING POINT
See also:

14 Oct 02 | Africa
16 Sep 02 | Africa
10 Oct 02 | Africa
23 Sep 02 | Africa
18 Sep 02 | Africa
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Africa stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Africa stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes