BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Somali Swahili French Great Lakes Hausa Portugeuse
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Africa  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Wednesday, 9 October, 2002, 09:17 GMT 10:17 UK
Somalia warlords boycott peace talks
Somali militia men
Rival warlords have divided up Somalia

Several Somali warlords have said they will not attend next week's reconciliation conference which they say will only further divide the country.

The warlords complain that 70% of the delegates on the conference's Intellectual Advisory Committee come from just one of Somalia's six clans.

They also resent the fact that delegates from civil society far outnumber backers of the faction leaders.

The conference is due to open in Eldoret, Kenya, on 15 October to try to put an end to 12 years of civil war.

'Discrimination'

"There are entire clans and regions which have been discriminated against and totally left out, such as Middle Juba, Gedo, Lower Shabelle, Banadir, Galgudud and parts of Mudug," one of the warlords, Mowlid Ma'ani, of Somalia's Bantu community, said at a joint meeting in Mogadishu on Tuesday.

President Abdulkassim Salat Hassan
President Salat has a shaky hold on power

The faction leaders said the conference was now being led by elements who did not want the conference to succeed, but they did not point the finger at any particular person, group or country.

Mr Mowlid has said until the talks became a Somali conference, where decisions would be taken for and by Somalis, they would not participate.

The conference has been organised by the regional Inter-Governmental Authority on Development (IGAD).

The talks will follow a dozen national conferences aimed at ending the factional conflict in the country, which has lacked a central government since the overthrow of President Mohamed Siad Barre in 1991.


Politics

Terrorist haven?

RESOURCES
See also:

17 Jun 02 | Africa
29 May 02 | Africa
25 May 02 | Africa
24 May 02 | Africa
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Africa stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Africa stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes