BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Somali Swahili French Great Lakes Hausa Portugeuse
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Africa  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Monday, 2 September, 2002, 19:33 GMT 20:33 UK
Summit deal cut on renewable energy
Solar ovens on display in Johannesburg
No targets were agreed for renewable energy
Governments at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg have reached agreement on renewable energy sources, delegates to the summit have said.

The text calls on all countries to "substantially increase" the global share of renewable energy but fails to set any target percentages or dates.

The agreement is a crucial step on the way to developing a common position for a final overall declaration which delegates hope to sign at the end of the summit on Wednesday.


1. Nearly 80% of energy comes from fossil fuels (oil 35%, coal 23.5% gas 20.7%)

2. Nuclear 6.8%
3. Hydropower 2.3%
4. Waste and renewable combustibles 11.1%
5.Others 0.5%


The European Union had been pushing for the share of renewables in global energy use to be raised from 14% to 15% by 2010 but the United States and other oil-producing nations opposed this.

But a spokesman for the environmentalist group Greenpeace, Steve Sawyer, said the agreement was "worse than we could have imagined".

Discussions are still stuck on a clause in the document referring to the provision of health services.

The US and some of the more conservative countries have opposed any wording which could be seen to support the provision of family planning services - and in particular safe abortion - to poorer women in developing countries.

Call for action

South African President Thabo Mbeki had opened the final phase of the summit by urging leaders to take firm action on poverty and the environment.

He appealed to delegates to "set concrete goals and targets" to help developing countries and protect the planet.

"Nothing, whatsoever, can justify any failure on our part to respond to this expectation," he said.

After Mr Mbeki spoke, world leaders took to the podium to deliver five-minute addresses.

Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe used the opportunity to launch a stinging attack on UK Prime Minister Tony Blair, defending his controversial land reform policies.

He told the British leader: "Keep your England and let me keep my Zimbabwe."

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Tom Heap
"The agreement failed to achieve hard targets for green energy supplies"
The BBC's Hilary Andersson
"It basically means the oil companies have won the argument on this one"

Key stories

SPECIAL REPORT

TALKING POINT

AUDIO VIDEO
See also:

29 Aug 02 | Africa
02 Sep 02 | Africa
02 Sep 02 | Africa
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Africa stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Africa stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes