BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Somali Swahili French Great Lakes Hausa Portugeuse
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Africa  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Wednesday, 28 August, 2002, 14:16 GMT 15:16 UK
Leaders urged to combat corruption
UN Committee on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) delegate Mehmet Arda, left, and Rodney Cooke from the UN International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) at the summit
Corruption "should be addressed" at the summit

An annual survey of levels of corruption in countries all over the world says that bribery, and corruption in all its forms, is now a major cause of poverty and backwardness.

The organisation Transparency International has called on the world leaders at the United Nations summit in Johannesburg on Sustainable Development, to combat corruption as a matter of urgency.

This year Transparency International includes 102 countries, the highest number ever, in its survey of known or perceived levels of corruption around the world.

Poverty-stricken woman in township
Bribery is a major cause of poverty
Countries in Africa, South America and Asia are judged to have the worst records.

Kenya, Angola, Madagascar, Nigeria, Paraguay, Indonesia and Bangladesh all score less than two on an index of up to 10. Transparency International says growing corruption has damaged efforts to establish democratic rule, and is a direct cause of financial and social disasters.

Corruption is seen as having increased sharply in Argentina, which is now unable to pay its international debts.

Graft and misrule have undermined democratic structures in Panama, Honduras, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador and Haiti.

Projects delayed

Official corruption has delayed and complicated vital decisions over projects like the Three Gorges Dam in China, which are meant to help provide clean water to large populations who lack it.

Some former communist countries, like Slovenia, are seen as improving their record. But despite recent efforts Russia remains seriously corrupt, as do other former soviet states such as Georgia, Ukraine, Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan.

Transparency International says that corrupt official and business people are trapping whole nations in poverty and hampering sustainable development.

It calls on leaders at the Johannesburg summit to tackle corruption urgently, and make pledges which they can keep.


Key stories

SPECIAL REPORT

TALKING POINT

AUDIO VIDEO
See also:

25 Aug 02 | Science/Nature
22 Aug 02 | Africa
06 Aug 02 | Africa
27 Aug 02 | Africa
12 Aug 02 | Americas
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Africa stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Africa stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes