BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Somali Swahili French Great Lakes Hausa Portugeuse
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Africa  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Monday, 26 August, 2002, 00:38 GMT 01:38 UK
World summit urged to look outwards
Woman in South African township
There has been a "stalemate" on poverty, UN official says

National leaders assembling here for the World Summit on Sustainable Development have heard an impassioned appeal to think globally.

It came from a senior United Nations official, Jan Pronk, the special envoy to the summit of the UN secretary-general, Kofi Annan.


We must stop this trend in inward-looking values... if we fail to include everyone we will breed resentment, which may also breed violence

Jan Pronk,
UN special envoy
The world could choose between an inclusive society and one that excluded the poor, he said. And exclusion could help to breed resentment and violence.

Mr Pronk said the world faced "a stark choice" between providing opportunities for the poor to develop, or continuing to let the rich get richer at the poor's expense.

There were even more people living below subsistence level than in 1992, at the time of the Rio Earth Summit, he said.

Unresolved issues

The last 10 years, Mr Pronk said, had seen slow environmental progress but "a stalemate" on poverty.

He said: "Post-September 11 last year, we have seen security being the overwhelming preoccupation of a country which is already safe.

Jan Pronk
Pronk: World faces a stark choice

"We have stoked up fears about aliens, strangers and 'illegals'. We can go for an exclusive society, with the poor and underdeveloped always excluded, or we can go for a world that is a safe place, where people have safe homes and jobs.

"We must stop this trend in inward-looking values, because if we fail to include everyone we will breed resentment, which may also breed violence."

Other UN officials say there are still 14 areas of serious disagreement to be resolved by delegates - not only ensuring clean water and energy for the world's poorest people, but also debt relief, development aid, globalisation, and the terms of trade.

They say two days of preliminary talks have managed to settle only 10 of 411 disputed issues.

One of the most divisive is whether the conference should end with binding commitments or aspirations.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Rageh Omaar in Johannesburg
"It is said to cost $50m to host the summit"

Key stories

SPECIAL REPORT

TALKING POINT

AUDIO VIDEO
See also:

25 Aug 02 | Africa
25 Aug 02 | Science/Nature
25 Aug 02 | Politics
23 Aug 02 | Science/Nature
22 Aug 02 | Africa
06 Aug 02 | Africa
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Africa stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Africa stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes