BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Somali Swahili French Great Lakes Hausa Portugeuse
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Africa  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Tuesday, 6 August, 2002, 08:49 GMT 09:49 UK
Niger clamp down after mutiny
The Niger Government has tightened controls on the media as it continues efforts to put down a mutiny in the army.

President Mamadou Tandja issued a decree cautioning the media against publishing information which could threaten national security.

Newspapers violating the decree face suspension or closure; journalists face being considered an accomplice to the mutiny.

The capital, Niamey, is reported to be calm after government forces earlier suppressed an uprising there, arresting most of the troops involved.

Loyal government soldiers continue to stand guard over the presidential premises in the capital, Niamey.

There is also increased security around other prominent government buildings as well as radio and television stations.

Early on Monday, members of three army garrisons were reported to have marched through the town, letting off their weapons.

The BBC's Idy Baraou in Niamey said that at least 100 men were involved in the mutiny and the fighting had been very heavy.

Talks

The government also says it has started talks with soldiers who mutinied in the south-east of Niger.

Niger soldiers (Pic: Focus on Africa magazine)
Niger soldiers have a history of mutinies
That mutiny began last Wednesday in the remote town of Diffa, when soldiers seized the town in a protest over unpaid wages.

The government sent forces to re-take Diffa, but the rebels withdrew north, into the Sahara desert, taking a number of hostages with them.

Some of the hostages, including the regional governor, Karaji Ayarga, are now reported to have been released.

The mutinies are the first in Niger since the 1999 election of President Mamadou Tandja, who comes from Diffa.

The landlocked former French colony - one of the poorest countries in the world - saw a spate of army mutinies in the late 1990s.

See also:

04 Aug 02 | Africa
03 Aug 02 | Africa
02 Aug 02 | Africa
26 Jul 01 | Country profiles
10 May 01 | Africa
07 Dec 01 | Africa
27 Nov 99 | Africa
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Africa stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Africa stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes