BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Somali Swahili French Great Lakes Hausa Portugeuse
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Africa  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Monday, 22 July, 2002, 16:59 GMT 17:59 UK
Mugabe's wife on EU sanctions list
President Mugabe and Grace Mugabe
No more trips to Europe for Zimbabwe's first family
European Union foreign ministers have agreed to extend sanctions on the leadership of Zimbabwe to include an extra 52 people.

This is in addition to the 20, including President Robert Mugabe, already covered by the first wave of EU sanctions agreed in February.


[Sanctions] will stop Grace Mugabe going on her shopping trips in the face of catastrophic poverty blighting the people of Zimbabwe

Glenys Kinnock European MP
Those on the new list include family members, such as Grace Mugabe, and other political and business leaders.

They will also be banned from travelling to EU countries and any assets they hold there will be frozen.

The EU's action was welcomed by the opposition Movement for Democratic Change in Zimbabwe.

The MDC's foreign affairs spokesman Tendai Biti said that it underlined that "the eyes of the international community are still firmly fixed on Mugabe and his illegitimate regime".

Unanimous

"All the members of his cabinet and leading members of the ruling Zanu-PF party are now on the blacklist, according to an EU diplomat, quoted by Reuters news agency.

The sanctions list now includes deputy minister and assistant secretaries in government departments.

Robert Mugabe
Robert Mugabe: UN flight

The vote on the new sanctions was unanimous and "underlines the EU's political will on this issue," the diplomat said.

The British Labour Party member of the European Parliament, Glenys Kinnock, said that the sanctions, "will stop Grace Mugabe going on her shopping trips in the face of catastrophic poverty blighting the people of Zimbabwe".

The European Union (EU) imposed a travel ban and asset freeze on a number of the country's leaders before the Zimbabwean elections in March.

'Man-made disaster

The EU took the measures after the head of its elections observer team was expelled from the country in a row over election violence, but there has been criticism that the sanctions are not working.

Britain's Foreign Secretary Jack Straw said the new sanctions applied to "the whole ruling elite".


Zimbabwe has many shops and people can go shopping in Zimbabwe

Home Affairs Minister John Nkomo

"Our quarrel has never been with the people of Zimbabwe but with those who have created the mounting food crisis and what is mainly a man-made disaster".

He said the ban on travel was increasing the Zimbabwean leadership's sense of isolation and was "extremely inconvenient and humiliating" for the political leadership.

Mr Mugabe got round the travel ban last month, visiting Rome for a United Nations-sponsored food conference.

'Period of transition'

But EU diplomats argue that wider economic sanctions just are not an option - suspending aid, they say, would hurt exactly the people they are trying to protect.

Food aid in Zimbabwe
EU does not want sanctions to hurt the poor

In its announcement welcoming the sanctions, the MDC called on the EU to expand the sanctions again if the "illegitimate Mugabe regime fails to take steps to end the political violence in Zimbabwe".

The movement also appealed for more humanitarian aid for southern Africa to cope with the widespread threat of famine.

Zimbabwe's Home Affairs Minister, John Nkomo, told the World Today, that political violence was not increasing in Zimbabwe.

"As a sovereign state we must be allowed to govern ourselves.

"There are human rights in Zimbabwe - we are going through a period of transition from when there were no human rights for black people in Zimbabwe."

He added: "We do not need to go shopping in Europe. Zimbabwe has many shops and people can go shopping in Zimbabwe.

"What is Europe anyway? There are other parts of the world."

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Fiona Werge
"Diplomats in Brussels believe political violence in Zimbabwe shows no sign of abating"
UK Foreign Secretary Jack Straw
"This means that virtually all the Zanu-PF ruling elite are subject to this travel ban"
BBC reporter Shada Islam speaking to Focus on Africa
"She is considered to be a very influential member of the inner circle around the President"

Key stories

IN DEPTH

CLICKABLE GUIDE

TALKING POINT

AUDIO VIDEO

FORUM
REGIONAL ROUNDUP
See also:

23 Feb 02 | Africa
23 Feb 02 | Africa
19 Feb 02 | Africa
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Africa stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Africa stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes