BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Somali Swahili French Great Lakes Hausa Portugeuse
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Africa  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Monday, 10 June, 2002, 21:31 GMT 22:31 UK
HIV infection 'slowing' in SA
Aids ribbon in Durban
The country is said to be over the worst of the crisis
South Africa has announced that the number of people becoming infected with HIV in the country is slowing down.

Health Minister Manto Tshabalala-Msimang said the authorities were confident that infection rates were now stabilising and she believed South Africa had seen the worst of the crisis.


I think the worst is over but we cannot rest on our laurels

South African health minister
Health Ministry figures show that the figure of new HIV infections for 2001 is likely to be around 40,000 - down on previous years.

South Africa has the highest number of people with HIV or Aids in the world, with one in nine people carrying the virus.

The BBC's Martin Plaut says that because HIV takes about eight years to develop into Aids, the number of people dying from the disease is projected to rise for some years to come.

Stabilisation

Ms Tshabalala-Msimang said around 4.74 million people had been infected by the end of 2001 compared with 4.7m the previous year.

Woman ill with Aids
Numbers dying of the disease will rise for some years more
"Although we see a slight increase, statistically this increase is not significant and we can confidently say that the prevalence rate has stabilised," she said.

"I think the worst is over but we cannot rest on our laurels. We have to send a message of hope."

The data are projections based on a study of 17,000 women who visited ante-natal clinics in October of last year.

Independent analysts say that, while the practice of using such statistics to project national figures corresponds to World Health Organisation guidelines, further studies are needed.

The latest fall in figures comes a month after the South African Government announced its commitment to the widespread distribution of the anti-retroviral drug Nevirapine, which it had previously argued was dangerous.

It has said it hopes to provide the drug across the country by December.

See also:

21 Apr 02 | Africa
04 Apr 02 | Africa
19 Feb 02 | Africa
25 Mar 02 | Africa
17 Feb 02 | Africa
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Africa stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Africa stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes