BBC NEWS Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific Somali Swahili French Great Lakes Hausa Portugeuse
BBCi NEWS   SPORT   WEATHER   WORLD SERVICE   A-Z INDEX     

BBC News World Edition
 You are in: Africa  
News Front Page
Africa
Americas
Asia-Pacific
Europe
Middle East
South Asia
UK
Business
Entertainment
Science/Nature
Technology
Health
-------------
Talking Point
-------------
Country Profiles
In Depth
-------------
Programmes
-------------
BBC Sport
BBC Weather
SERVICES
-------------
LANGUAGES
EDITIONS
Sunday, 19 August, 2001, 18:51 GMT 19:51 UK
SA activist Donald Woods dies
File photo of Donald Woods, left, and Doreen Lawrence, whose son was killed by white youths, granting an award to Nelson Mandela.
Donald Woods, left, never stopped fighting apartheid
The South African newspaper editor and anti-apartheid activist, Donald Woods, has died of cancer at the age of 67.

Mr Woods had drawn world attention to the case of Steve Biko, the black consciousness leader who was killed by South African security forces while in detention.

Mr Woods died in hospital near London surrounded by his wife Wendy and five children, his daughter Jane said.

She said the former South African President, Nelson Mandela, had telephoned his good wishes several days ago.

The South African High Commissioner in London, Cheryl Carolus, described Mr Woods as a "truly great son of South Africa".

She said that, though his great life of courage had ended, his spirit lived on with his people.

Active in exile

As editor of the Daily Dispatch from 1965 he forcefully condemned the apartheid government's policy of racial discrimination.

Steve Biko
Donald Woods brought attention to the case of Steve Biko
Mr Woods was forced to flee South Africa in 1977 after he was arrested and banned because of his friendship with Mr Biko.

Under a five-year banning order, he was barred from his office and forbidden to travel, write or speak publicly.

He fled South Africa disguised as a priest, and settled in London with his family.

In exile he wrote several books and continued to campaign against apartheid.

He and Mr Biko were made famous by the film Cry Freedom, which was based on his autobiography.

Honoured

Last year, Queen Elizabeth II made Mr Woods a Commander of the British Empire, for his human rights activities.

He first returned to South Africa after 13 years in exile in August 1990.

His last visit was in May, where he attended the wedding of Mr Biko's son, Nkosinathi Biko.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
The BBC's Jane Bennett-Powell
"Donald... was considered one of their own by black South Africans"
Dr Xolela Mangcu, Steve Biko Foundation
"He exposed the lies that were manufactured around Steve Biko's death"
See also:

01 Aug 01 | Country profiles
19 May 00 | From Our Own Correspondent
20 Aug 01 | Entertainment
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Africa stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Africa stories

© BBC ^^ Back to top

News Front Page | Africa | Americas | Asia-Pacific | Europe | Middle East |
South Asia | UK | Business | Entertainment | Science/Nature |
Technology | Health | Talking Point | Country Profiles | In Depth |
Programmes