Languages
Page last updated at 16:33 GMT, Wednesday, 23 December 2009

American Airlines plane overshoots runway in Jamaica

Advertisement

Roland Henry, Jamaica Observer: "People were nursing wounds with towels and shirts"

An American Airlines plane has overshot the runway on landing in heavy rain in the Jamaican capital Kingston, injuring more than 40 people, officials say.

The fuselage of flight AA 331, carrying 154 people from Miami, broke apart after the incident at Norman Manley International Airport.

Jamaican officials said 44 people had been taken to nearby hospitals for treatment. Four were seriously hurt.

The plane came to a halt just 10-15ft (3-5m) from the sea.

American Airlines spokesman Tim Smith said the fuselage of the Boeing 737-800 was cracked, the right engine had broken off and the main landing gear had collapsed.

'Panic'

The plane, which had originated in Washington DC, was carrying 148 passengers and six crew.

American Airlines plane in Kingston
A team of US investigators is heading to Jamaica

Passenger Pilar Abaurrea, from the US state of New Hampshire, told the Associated Press news agency of chaotic scenes as the plane hit the ground.

"All of a sudden... the plane was kind of bouncing, someone said the plane was skidding and there was panic," she said.

She said the pilot had warned of turbulence just before landing, but had said it probably would not be too serious.

Local journalist Roland Henry said survivors had thought the plane was landing normally before there was a series of jolts and luggage tumbled from overhead lockers.

One passenger told local media: "The plane did not seem to be slowing down when it landed. There was a loud sound, then a huge thud and then we started to feel rain coming through the top."

Another told Agence France-Presse news agency that the emergency services were too slow to respond: "We were there for about 20 minutes or more and there was no-one there. What if there was a fire? We would've all died."

Most of the injuries were believed to be cuts, bruises and some broken bones. None are thought to be life-threatening.

A team of investigators from the US National Transportation Safety Board is travelling to Jamaica to help with the investigation.

The airport was closed for a while but has now reopened, AP reported.

Map showing where crash happened


Are you in Jamaica? Have you been caught up in events at the airport? Send us your comments using the form below:

Send your pictures and video to yourpics@bbc.co.uk, text them to +44 7725 100 100 or you have a large file you can upload here.Read the terms and conditions

At no time should you endanger yourself or others, take any unnecessary risks or infringe any laws.

A selection of your comments may be published, displaying your name and location unless you state otherwise in the box below.

Name
Your E-mail address
Town & Country
Phone number
Comments

The BBC may edit your comments and not all emails will be published. Your comments may be published on any BBC media worldwide.




Print Sponsor


SEE ALSO
Country profile: Jamaica
03 Aug 12 |  Country profiles
Timeline: Jamaica
20 Aug 12 |  Country profiles

RELATED INTERNET LINKS
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

FROM OTHER NEWS SITES
Philadelphia Inquirer Officials probe why jet overshot runway - 2 hrs ago
Daily Star Dozens hurt as US jet misses runwayFull Story - 3 hrs ago
Pretoria NewsPainful landing for passengers as plane skids - 4 hrs ago
The Scotsman Scores injured as plane skids off runway and stops just short of sea - 10 hrs ago
CHINAdaily Plane misses Jamaica runway; 44 hurt - 10 hrs ago
* Requires registration



FEATURES, VIEWS, ANALYSIS
Has China's housing bubble burst?
How the world's oldest clove tree defied an empire
Why Royal Ballet principal Sergei Polunin quit

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

Copyright © 2018 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific