Page last updated at 18:44 GMT, Monday, 26 October 2009

Soldier dies from blast injuries

UK soldiers fighting in Operation Panther's Claw
Some 223 UK military personnel have died in Afghanistan since 2001

A British soldier has died in a UK hospital from wounds sustained in an attack in Afghanistan in September.

The unnamed soldier, of the Black Watch, 3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, died on Sunday in Selly Oak Hospital, Birmingham.

He was injured when an improvised explosive device went off in Kandahar province six weeks ago.

His commanding officer, Lt Col Stephen Cartwright expressed his "immense sadness" at the soldier's death.

He said: "Despite a most determined and courageous fight against his injuries sustained in Afghanistan, he died last night in Selly Oak Hospital.

"On behalf of everyone in the Battalion, I offer my deepest sympathy and prayers to his family and loved ones who have been with him these past few difficult days."

The soldier's next of kin have been informed, the Ministry of Defence said.

An MoD statement said he had been injured on 15 September 2009.

"Despite the best efforts of medical staff both in theatre and back in the UK, over a period of nearly six weeks, he sadly died as a result of his wounds," it went on.

The death takes the number of British service personnel to die in Afghanistan since operations began in 2001 to 223.



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