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Sunday, January 25, 1998 Published at 07:30 GMT



World

Egyptian sues British Queen over Diana's death
image: [ Britain's Queen with Prime Minister Tony Blair ]
Britain's Queen with Prime Minister Tony Blair

An Egyptian lawyer is suing the Queen and Prime Minister Tony Blair for damages, alleging they conspired to kill Diana, Princess of Wales, because she was in love with a Muslim.


[ image: Diana on the night she died]
Diana on the night she died
The case is expected to be heard in a Cairo court on Sunday.

Lawyer Nabih Alwahsi is seeking damages of $170,000 from both the Queen and Mr Blair.

He says they plotted to murder the Princess because they were embarrassed by her love affair with an Egyptian Muslim.

He also says the British establishment was determined to prevent a Muslim from becoming step-father to the future King.

In his deposition, Mr Alwahsi said he thought England was the champion of democracy and religious freedom and he was so disillusioned after the accident, only a court case could ease his psychological pain.

The case has already been delayed once by the judge so British officials in Cairo could have time to inform authorities in London. However, they do not appear to have bothered.

A British spokesman in Cairo says the Embassy has not received any formal notice of the case.


[ image: Dodi Al-Fayed]
Dodi Al-Fayed
The BBC's correspondent in Cairo says conspiracy theories about the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, are popular in the Arab world, especially in Egypt where her lover Dodi Al-Fayed was born.

It is not the first time an Egypian lawyer has tried to sue the head of another state. Lawyers have sued Israeli leaders as well as the American President, Bill Clinton.

Mr Alwahsi's case looks doomed to failure, as judges usually say they do not have sufficient jurisdiction.






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