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Monday, November 8, 1999 Published at 12:05 GMT


World

Sights and sounds of 1989



Communism - the end of an era
When the Berlin Wall opened on 9 November 1989, families and friends wept tears of joy. It was a time of euphoria and hope for the future. Ten years on, BBC News Online looks back at the sights and sounds of that historic reunion between East and West Germany.


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When the Berlin Wall opened there was a mass exodus of East Germans. For those in the West, East German cars were a symbol of the differences between the economies of the split nation.

 The night the wall opened


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On 9 November 1989, East Berliners could no longer be kept back. Families and friends were reunited; others just wanted to see what it was like on the other side.

 Stephen Milligan looks at the history of the Wall


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It must have been a bewildering time for young people, swept along by the excitement of that night.

 David Loyn reports from Philipsthal, East Germany as the Wall opens


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It was described as the biggest street party in Europe. Pictures were broadcast live all around the world.

 Ben Brown reports as East and West Berlin are reunited


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Jubilant Berliners dance on the Brandenburg Gate, still one of Berlin's most recognised landmarks. The 10 year anniversary celebrations will include a ceremony at the gate, with speeches by Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder and Berlin Mayor Eberhard Diepgen. There wil also be a concert by rock band The Scorpions accompanied by Mstislav Rostropovich and 165 other cellists.

 Julia Michaelis, local leader of the New Forum looks back on November 1989


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When the Wall fell, many parts were broken up and sold as souvenirs.

 Michael Hamburger, New Forum spokesman on why the Wall fell


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Two boys cycle near Hoetensleben, former East Germany. Ten years after Communism, a watch tower and remants of the former border wall have been preserved as momuments.




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