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Page last updated at 05:38 GMT, Tuesday, 23 September 2008 06:38 UK

India boss 'lynched by workers'

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The Indian head of an Italian auto parts company has been beaten to death in a suburb of Delhi, allegedly by a group of sacked workers.

Lalit Kishore Choudhary, of Graziano Trasmissioni India, died at the company factory in Greater Noida.

Police said more than 100 dismissed workers entered the factory vandalised machinery and attacked Mr Choudhary.

The confrontation came after a long industrial dispute. The workers denied killing Mr Choudhary.

Nearly 300 workers at Graziano Trasmissioni were dismissed two months ago after they demanded pay rises and allegedly ransacked its offices, the AFP news agency reported.

Damaged

The meeting with Mr Choudhary, which took place on Monday, was reportedly scheduled to discuss the possibility of reinstating some of the workers.

However, "the dismissed employees turned violent during a meeting with the management," Reuters news agency quoted senior police officer RK Chaturvedi as saying.

Some 63 people were arrested, Mr Chaturvedi said.

He described how angry workers damaged office property and singled out Mr Choudhary when he tried to reason with the mob. They allegedly used iron bars to beat up the chief executive.

But the workers denied attacking Mr Choudhary, described in one report as a 47-year-old father of one.

"We were demonstrating peacefully to get our jobs back," one of the workers, Rajpal, told the Hindustan Times newspaper.

"Outsiders may have assaulted the CEO leading to his death. Firing by the guards agitated workers and they clashed with the staff," he said.

Dozens of people injured in the clash have been admitted to hospital.





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