BBC Home
Explore the BBC
BBC News
Launch consoleBBC NEWS CHANNEL
Languages
Last Updated: Thursday, 9 December 2004, 03:31 GMT
Ukraine's 'orange' capital
By Martha Shokalo in Kiev

Orange - the colour of Ukraine's opposition - has taken Kiev by storm. It is seen almost everywhere - on people's clothes, inside the capital's boutiques and even on cosmetics products.

Pro-Yushchenko demonstrators in Kiev
Kiev has become the most orange capital in the world

There are a number of ways to show solidarity with the latest events in Ukraine - people in many European cities have been wearing orange stripes, while German lawmakers have even brought oranges inside the parliament building.

In Ukrainian, the colour of Viktor Yushchenko's camp can be described by three different words. But Kiev has seen many more shades of orange - from pale yellow to light brown.

Doctors say the orange colour is healthy - just like real oranges - as its strengthens the immune system.

Orange city

Until recently the colour has been closely associated with a mobile operator, and also shirts of Shakhtar Donetsk football club from eastern Ukraine.

I have a blue scarf. But when I walk along Khreshchatyk people tell me: 'You should change the colour to orange'. And I don't really like orange that much
Svitlana, Kiev shop seller
However, from now on and, perhaps, for some time to come it will always remind people of the protests.

Drivers have been the first to start using orange symbols - stripes are now seen on car antennas, door handles and mirrors. Some vehicles have big orange flags attached to them.

Several garages are now offering to paint your car into the hit colour.

Many people now wear deep yellow hats, scarves, coats, gloves and even shoes - you name it.

Women like to attach orange stripes to their handbags and also in their hair. I have seen a girl who had a tiny stripe tied on her little finger. Some women have orange lips, eyes and nails, while the most brave die their hair orange.

Boom slows down

Nowadays, one can buy orange things practically anywhere in Kiev.

An underground passage in Kiev
Even graffiti on the city's walls are mostly orange

Most often these are scarves and hats. The most pricy ones - with Yushchenko symbols and of good quality - can be yours for 60-100 Ukrainian hryvnia ($11-19), while the cheaper ones will set you back 20-30 hryvnia ($4-6).

Nina, a street vendor, says her daily sales now reach 7,000 hryvnia ($1,317), whereas before she could only rely on only 200-300 hryvnia ($40-60) a day.

Another vendor, Lyudmyla, sells scarves, bandages and small round badges that she calls "oranges". She then buys food and cooks free dinners for protesters.

In a clothes shop on Kiev's main street, Khreshchatyk, orange collection has been snapped within days.

The shop's blue clothes - on the other hand - are hardly noticed at all, says Svitlana, who works there.

"I have a blue scarf. But when I walk along Khreshchatyk people tell me: 'You should change the colour to orange'. And I don't really like orange that much," she adds.

However, shop owners say the orange boom is slowing down and people are now more interested to get Christmas trees and New Year's decorations.

Kiev's main Independence Square itself will soon see a green Christmas tree instead of orange-clad demonstrators.



FROM OTHER NEWS SITES:
CBC Tired Ukrainian protesters heading home - 1 hr ago
ABCNEWS.com Opposition Supporters Leave Kiev Tent Camp - 2 hrs ago
Boston Globe Reform vote eases crisis in Ukraine - 3 hrs ago
Los Angeles TimesReforms Defuse Crisis in Ukraine - 5 hrs ago
Washington PostYushchenko Vows Punishment for Crimes - 6 hrs ago
* Requires registration
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


RELATED INTERNET LINKS:
The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites


PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

Americas Africa Europe Middle East South Asia Asia Pacific