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Thursday, 26 April, 2001, 12:48 GMT 13:48 UK
Third French CJD victim dies
Eboli family outside Paris court
The Eboli family is suing governments over the disease
A 19-year-old man has become the third victim in France to die of the human form of mad cow disease.

Arnaud Eboli died on Wednesday from variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), the human type of BSE, his family have announced.

Mr Eboli's mother with a photo of him
Arnaud Eboli died shortly before his 20th birthday
Last year, a lawyer acting for Mr Eboli and Laurence Duahamel - another victim of the disease - sued the French, British and EU authorities alleging they had failed to take all the necessary steps to contain the epidemic.

The law suits - filed in a Paris civil court - accuse Britain of knowingly exporting possibly contaminated material, and France and the European Commission of not taking the threat of disease seriously enough.

Britain, where the outbreak of BSE has been most severe, has so far confirmed 97 deaths from vCJD and the Republic of Ireland one.

Feed investigation

The news of Mr Eboli's death comes a day after French magistrates placed under official investigation a firm allegedly distributing contaminated feed.

French butcher
Trafficking in animal feed might explain recent discoveries of BSE infected meat
Youssef Chataoui, head of the French company Euro Feed, is accused of illegal involvement in trafficking meat-based animal feed.

Feed products were allegedly brought from France, Ireland and the Netherlands to Belgium, where they were relabelled.

France banned bone meal from animal feed in 1990 and further tightened its controls in 1996.

"This discovery, if confirmed, could explain the scientific mystery of how certain cows born after the ban on animal derivatives in their feed could develop mad cow disease," the Le Parisien newspaper commented.

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See also:

22 Feb 01 | Europe
Governments sued over BSE
13 Feb 01 | Business
BSE threat to EU farm programme
05 Jan 01 | Europe
Europe's growing concern
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