BBC Homepage World Service Education
BBC Homepagelow graphics version | feedback | help
BBC News Online
 You are in: World: Asia-Pacific
Front Page 
World 
Africa 
Americas 
Asia-Pacific 
Europe 
Middle East 
South Asia 
-------------
From Our Own Correspondent 
-------------
Letter From America 
UK 
UK Politics 
Business 
Sci/Tech 
Health 
Education 
Entertainment 
Talking Point 
In Depth 
AudioVideo 

Saturday, 14 October, 2000, 06:47 GMT 07:47 UK
Estrada 'conscience clear'
protests in manila
Anti-Estrada protests have been gathering momentum
Philippines President Joseph Estrada has rejected allegations linking him to gambling lords, saying he is ready to face those accusing him of receiving payoffs from illegal betting syndicates.

But in a televised address he also announced the government was getting out of all forms of betting, and a state gaming firm would be transferred to the private sector.

estrada
President Estrada fought back against accusations
The president has several times denied accusations made by a provincial governor, Luis "Chavit" Singson, that he received 414 million pesos ($8.7m) in payoffs from gambling syndicates running an illegal numbers game.

Mr Singson, a former friend of the President, says he personally delivered cash and cheques from the gambling operators to Mr Estrada over the last two years.

Broadcast

But in a national broadcast Mr Estrada said his conscience was clear.

"I am ready to face my accusers - I am sure the truth will come out."

"The people do not want the government to be involved in gambling. The message is clear."

Luis Singson, Estrada's former friend
Luis Singson said he delivered cash and cheques
The state gaming firm, Philippine Amusements and Gaming Corporation, has control over legalised gambling such as on-line bingo and casinos.

"I was wrong in thinking we could change the culture of gambling and the role of the government," he said.

"I was also wrong in choosing my friends."

He hinted that those affected by legal gambling had brought about the scandal.

"We wanted government instead of the corrupt to earn revenues.

"Those who were affected by this decision became angry so now, they are carrying out all sorts of schemes," President Estrada added.

Search BBC News Online

Advanced search options
Launch console
BBC RADIO NEWS
BBC ONE TV NEWS
WORLD NEWS SUMMARY
PROGRAMMES GUIDE
See also:

13 Oct 00 | Asia-Pacific
Estrada charges delayed
12 Oct 00 | Asia-Pacific
Philippines vice-president quits cabinet
12 Oct 00 | Media reports
Estrada: I'm innocent
11 Oct 00 | Asia-Pacific
Cardinal Sin tells Estrada to quit
10 Oct 00 | Asia-Pacific
Philippine leader faces impeachment
18 Sep 00 | Asia-Pacific
Estrada the man of action
Internet links:


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites

Links to more Asia-Pacific stories are at the foot of the page.


E-mail this story to a friend

Links to more Asia-Pacific stories