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Monday, 27 May, 2002, 13:45 GMT 14:45 UK
Speed cameras cut incidents
Arrive Alive van
There are 14 routes in north east Wales
A campaign launched by North Wales Police to reduce the number of casualties on accident blackspots has been hailed a massive success.

There has been a 53% decrease in the number of people killed or slightly injured on the regions roads in the past six months.

Speed camera
Around 17,000 motorists have been caught speeding

Ten people have been killed or seriously injured between January and March 2002 compared to an average of 21 people for the a comparative period before the scheme was launched.

It is estimated that 17,000 motorists have been detected exceeding the speed limit since the scheme began.

The initiative entitled Arrive Alive was launched last year in response to government targets of a 40% casualty reduction on UK roads by 2010.

Project Manager, Chief Inspector Richard Hughes, said: "These are only initial figures, the project is still in its infancy and there's some way to go until we reach our targets, but we are extremely proud of our achievements to date.


Not many people realise that Arrive Alive is a partnership and that the health service is affected directly by the scheme

Gareth Morgan North Wales Health Authority

"All members of the partnership have worked hard to achieve these figures, but our biggest thanks go to the people of north Wales for making these reductions a reality."

The mobile speeding units have been set up in 14 targeted areas in north east Wales - including the A541 Mold Road from Wrexham to Cefn-y-Bedd where there has been one death and 10 serious injuries in the past three years.

Gareth Morgan, Assistant Director at North Wales Health Authority, said: "Not many people realise that Arrive Alive is a partnership and that the health service is affected directly by the scheme.

"By securing reductions in speeds on routes which have high collision and casualty rates it is evident that there will be a reduction in the number of hospital beds occupied by victims of collisions.

"This can only be good news for individuals awaiting hospital treatment."

During 2001, people involved in road traffic collisions occupied a total of 3101 bed days in north Wales hospitals.

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