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Last Updated: Wednesday, 13 April, 2005, 20:44 GMT 21:44 UK
Election at-a-glance: 13 April
All you need to know about Day Nine of the UK's 2005 general election campaign, at-a-glance:

13 APRIL IN A SENTENCE

Labour launch their election manifesto with a call to make the changes they have delivered last "for all time", while the Tories go on the attack over Labour spending plans, and the Lib Dems highlight their plans for free eye and dental checks and personal care for the elderly.

CAMPAIGN CATCH-UP

Labour launch their election manifesto, which includes a pledge not to increase the basic or top rate of income tax, but says nothing about National Insurance.

The Conservatives warn that taxes will rise if Labour wins a third term, with Michael Howard saying Tony Blair has "lost the plot".

Dental checks and eye tests should be free for everyone, the Liberal Democrats say, as they highlight their health plans. Leader Charles Kennedy will launch the party's manifesto on Thursday.

The Bourgass ricin plot case shows the problems of having insecure borders, say the Tories. The government says checks are tighter now and the Lib Dems say it may be an isolated case.

The Conservatives say they want to see "perhaps thousands" more faith schools, insisting major expansion of religious education is at the heart of their party's vision.

The Tory leader of the House of Lords expresses concern over Labour's plans to reform the second chamber.

The Liberal Democrats' first election broadcast, which features leader Charles Kennedy prominently, tells how support for their party is growing across the UK.

The Tories' first election broadcast attracts 12.8m viewers - almost a million more than Labour's advert featuring Tony Blair and Gordon Brown.

PICK OF THE ANALYSIS

Labour's election manifesto launch was extraordinary, with an unmissable message behind the policy detail - this is Tony Blair's last election.

They may have been criticised for having similar policies, but nobody could accuse the Conservatives and Labour of stealing each other's manifesto designs.

Three polls since the weekend suggest that the gap between Labour and the Conservatives is edging a little in Labour's favour.

PHOTO OF THE DAY

Tony Blair, flanked by John Prescott and Gordon Brown, holding manifestos
Labour's manifesto launch was a team effort

A VIEW FROM SPAIN

Madrid's ABC describes the British election as a "ritual", rather than the spectacle of its US equivalent - but with no less emotional charge.

In fact, it says, the election campaign promises to be more intense than ever, "albeit within the boundaries of what is permitted by the typical sobriety displayed by the parties in the UK".

The fact that he is seeking a third term, together with the "spectre" of the Iraq war, puts the figure of Tony Blair, his style of government and his decisions at the centre of the party political debate, it says.

ABC says this is as much to do with his opponents' weakness as his own political capital, and he has seen a "progressive erosion" of support, particularly among the young, urban population.

The polls in Britain are significant, it says, with three of four surveys in the last week predicting a Labour victory - albeit a narrower one than their 2001 landslide.

With two terms behind them, the language of Tony Blair and Labour seems to be reaching the end of its cycle, ABC says.

"The question is whether this will come in May or whether we shall have to wait another four years," it adds.

QUOTE OF THE DAY

Let's make the values of social justice and a fair deal for all the governing ideal of our country not just for some time but for all time.

Tony Blair, in the preface to Labour's election manifesto

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