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Page last updated at 20:51 GMT, Tuesday, 5 August 2008 21:51 UK

Sats results: Parents speak out

The delayed results of this year's national curriculum tests - or Sats - for 11-year-olds in England have been published, despite many papers still being unmarked.

The National Association of Head Teachers has criticised the decision, saying ministers are issuing the results prematurely.

But Schools Secretary Ed Balls said statisticians advised him publication should go ahead despite the problems.

According to the latest figures released by the contractor responsible for marking the tests, ETS, 99% of Key Stage 2 results "are now available to schools". But it is not clear how many primary schools are still missing a complete set of marks.

Read Scottish pupils's exam stories

Parents of children who are still waiting for their Sats marks have been writing to the BBC with their concerns.

ANDREW ALLMAN, DISEWORTH, DERBYSHIRE

Andrew's 11-year-old son William is still waiting for his Sats results.

Andrew Allman, parent
"This appears to be incompetence of the highest order" - Andrew Allman, parent

My son's school broke up for the school holidays 3 weeks ago, but none of the pupils had received their results.

The teachers told everyone they would not be able to give them out until September.

There has been bemusement and confusion amongst the kids. They are only 11 years old, and they have worked incredibly hard. To not have delivered the results to them is a real let down. The last thing we need to be doing is letting kids down at an early age.

I was so angry about it I wrote to my local MP when I first found out about the delay. He raised the question in the House of Commons.

He was supportive, but I am frustrated that Ed Balls seems to be passing responsibility and accountability onto other bodies.

To be fair, the teachers have been let down as well. The government says it is confident in the exams, but everyone else I have heard talking about them is not, so things are not looking great.

I worry about all the children hearing things about Sats in the news - I really think it reduces their confidence. We forget about that.

FIONA TOWLE, NOTTINGHAM

Fiona's 11-year-old son is still waiting for his Sats results.

Fiona Towle, parent
"Every child who has had their results delayed should receive an apology" - Fiona Towle, parent

What an absolute disgrace. We are still waiting for my son's results and even when we get them, how do we know they will be accurate?

Before my son's school broke up, some marks had been received, but not all. The headteacher thought some were questionable.

We haven't heard anything since then and we are still waiting.

I don't blame the school at all. The headteacher has promised that as soon as she receives them, we will.

To be honest, it is more annoying than worrying.

I don't like the idea of Sats. I don't think we should judge kids in this way, but to make the kids work this hard and then wait for so long is an absolute disgrace.

Every child who has experienced these delays should be personally apologised to by each institution concerned.

My son is not impressed, he thinks we may never get to the bottom of it. He was hoping to get three Level 5s, but with all the problems, he's worried that if the papers are not checked properly he won't know whether to believe them or not.




SEE ALSO
Pupils tell their exam stories
05 Aug 08 |  Scotland
Test results record small gains
05 Aug 08 |  Education
Knight 'confident' on Sats result
05 Aug 08 |  Education


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