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Page last updated at 15:02 GMT, Wednesday, 30 July 2008 16:02 UK

Man jailed for bid to make bombs

Hassan Tabbakh
Tabbakh claimed he was using chemicals to make fireworks

A 38-year-old man has been sentenced to seven years in prison for attempting to make bombs for terrorist attacks.

Police found liquid chemicals and notes written in Arabic at the Birmingham home of Syria-born Hassan Tabbakh, 38, following his arrest in December 2007.

The jury also heard that speeches by al-Qaeda leader Osama Bin Laden were found on the defendant's MP3 player.

Tabbakh denied the charge at Birmingham Crown Court, saying he was making fireworks for a religious festival.

He faced a single charge of obtaining chemicals and compiling and retaining a document with instructions for making an explosive device.

Tabbakh, of Small Heath, claimed he was considering starting up a fireworks business, although he said that he did not have a licence.

The court also heard that a USB memory stick and the defendant's home PC contained links to computer sites showing terrorist attacks on coalition vehicle convoys in either Afghanistan or Iraq.

Prosecutor Max Hill QC said that Tabbakh was "caught in the process of a practical attempt to create improvised explosive devices".

"Because he was caught in the act, it follows that the defendant had not completed his task, so the bombs were not finally constructed," Mr Hill said.

"Neither the written instructions nor the bomb mixtures had reached their destination - when or where the bombs were going to be used is not known.


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