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Thursday, 29 March, 2001, 11:25 GMT 12:25 UK
Princess's history of ill health
Princess Margaret
The Princess had endured illnesses of one kind or another for decades
Princess Margaret, who has died at the age of 71, has been dogged by ill-health as far back as the 1970s.

This latest stroke, which was followed by cardiac problems, came after three previous strokes.

A spokesman for the Stroke Association told BBC News Online it was not unusual to have heart problems after a stroke.

Even before 1998 when she suffered her first stroke, Princess Margaret had suffered from poor health.

Scalded feet

She had suffered a nervous breakdown, had had part of a lung removed and badly scalded her feet in a bathing accident.

Princess Margaret also suffered from migraines, laryngitis, bronchitis, hepatitis and pneumonia.

The operation on her lung failed to stop her smoking, even though four royals - Edward VII, George V, Edward VIII and the Princess's own father, George VI - died from smoking-related illnesses.

On Mustique in the Caribbean with friends
In happier times: Holidaying on Mustique
In 1974, Princess Margaret suffered a nervous breakdown two years before her marriage to photographer Lord Snowdon ended. They had been together for 16 years.

Four years later, pneumonia diagnosed at Tuvalu in the South Pacific was deemed sufficiently serious for her to be flown to hospital in Sydney.

In January 1980, she was admitted to the London Clinic for an operation to remove a benign skin lesion.

She was back in hospital in January 1985, this time for an operation to have part of her lung removed.

Serious illnesses
May 1978 - gastro-enteritis, mild hepatitis
April 1981 - bronchitis
January 1985 - non-malignant lung tissue removed
November 1992 - feverish respiratory infection
January 1993 - suspected pneumonia
February 1998 - mild stroke
March 1999 - scalding to feet
December 2000 - possible second stroke
March 2001 - minor stroke
It proved to be non-malignant and she was back on cigarettes within several months, although she managed to cut down from 60-a-day to 30.

She was able to continue royal engagements following surgery.

In May 1992 she cancelled several days of engagements with a "feverish cold", and in late November suffered a "feverish infection".

First stroke

Despite the illness, she managed to attend the wedding of the Princess Royal and Commander Tim Laurence in Scotland in December 1992.

On 3 January, 1993, Princess Margaret was admitted to the King Edward VII Hospital, London, with pneumonia. She was reportedly taken ill while staying with friends outside London.

Her first minor stroke is believed to have happened in February 1998.

She badly scalded her feet in March 1999 in a bathroom accident while holidaying on the Caribbean island of Mustique.

In November of that year, she was taken ill at her home in Kensington Palace, London.

Princess Margaret at a gala occasion
The Princess fought to fulfil public duties
On that occasion Buckingham Palace gave no details of the ailment affecting the princess.

Over Christmas 2000 she was confined to bed at Sandringham.

Medical tests suggested a second stroke.

In January 2001, she was admitted to King Edward VII Hospital suffering severe loss of appetite but recovered strongly.

Princess Margaret, who was paralysed down her left side and suffered sight problems, and was rarely seen in public over recent months, is believed to have suffered a third stroke.

News of her death following a further stroke and cardiac problems was released by Buckingham Palace early on Saturday morning.

See also:

29 Mar 01 | UK
Princess suffers new stroke
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