Europe South Asia Asia Pacific Americas Middle East Africa BBC Homepage World Service Education



Front Page

World

UK

UK Politics

Business

Sci/Tech

Health

Education

Sport

Entertainment

Talking Point
On Air
Feedback
Low Graphics
Help

Monday, October 12, 1998 Published at 17:26 GMT 18:26 UK


Party fundraising: what Labour wants



The Labour Party submitted their proposals to the Neill Committee on February 26, 1998. Proposals included:

  • Companies to seek majority shareholder approval before making a political donation. Shareholders opposing the donation would qualify for a rebate in proportion to their shareholding;

  • The establishment of an independent electoral commission to enforce limits on political parties' spending during election campaigns;

  • The imposition of a "voluntary" ceiling of 5,000 on undeclared political donations from individuals;

  • A 15m limit on election expenditure;

  • A 1.5m ceiling on campaign expenditures by "third parties", such as trade unions and affiliated bodies;

  • Abolition of blind trusts - anonymous donations like those used to fund the private offices of senior party figures;

  • Legal requirement for parties to publish their audited revenue accounts and balance sheets annually;

  • Ban on donations from individuals not on a UK electoral register;

  • Ban on donations from companies not incorporated under UK law or without substantial domestic business interests.




Advanced options | Search tips




Back to top | BBC News Home | BBC Homepage |


Internet Links


Labour Party


The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites.




In this section

Hague ups ante on funding reforms

Party funding 'arms race' capped

Row erupts over political funding

Cross-party backing for Neill report

All-powerful Election Commission

Fair funding for referendums

More teeth for honours watchdog

The 100 recommendations - part 1

The 100 recommendations - part 2

Escalating election expenses

Reforming party funding

International political funding systems