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BBC Scotland Forbes McFall
"One of the main reasons for the increase is thought to be the fall in the price of scrap metal"
 real 28k

Wednesday, 23 August, 2000, 08:56 GMT 09:56 UK
Cars dumped in street 'scrapyards'
Burnt-out car
Abandoned cars are a safety hazard
Thousands of Scottish drivers are dumping their old cars by the roadside instead of selling them for scrap.

The RAC Foundation estimates that about 2,000 cars are being abandoned every year in Glasgow and Edinburgh alone.

The organisation said it was concerned about risks to the environment and people's safety.

The study found that many cars were dumped in dangerous positions, such as near pedestrian crossings.

In most areas, after ensuring that the police have no interest in the vehicle, officials put a seven-day warning notice on the vehicle.

Traffic
Motorists are being asked to think twice
Up to 50% of vehicles are not claimed and are towed to the crusher.

Glasgow has set a target of three days to remove dumped cars from the streets.

RAC Foundation chief executive Edmund King said: "Some of our roads now have the appearance of Steptoe's back yard.

"We are asking motorists to think twice before dumping their motors as they cause safety and environmental hazards.

"It also costs the council taxpayer, as local authorities have to pay thousands of pounds a year to remove the cars.

"The combination of falling values for used cars and scrap metal means that many motorists don't dispose of their vehicles properly.

Low scrap value

"Many cars are only worth 2 or 3 in scrap value, and often it would cost more in petrol to drive the banger to a scrap yard."

A spokeswoman for Edinburgh City Council said: "The number of abandoned vehicles is increasing in the city - mostly in the peripheral areas of housing schemes and on waste ground.

"We remove them from the streets in three days once we have checked with police.

"They go into a big compound until we can trace the owner or registered keeper."

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