Page last updated at 10:59 GMT, Monday, 20 October 2008 11:59 UK

Motorists spot stag roaming on M8

Red stag sculpture
The stag shares his field with a well-known flock of red sheep

A giant red stag has become the latest roadside attraction for motorists on the M8 between Glasgow and Edinburgh.

Hamish the stag was "set free" on Sunday at the Pyramids Business Park in West Lothian, already known for its flock of red sheep.

He was created by sculptor Andy Scott for Cumbernauld galvanising firm, Highland.

Andy Scott was also responsible for the Heavy Horse which stands beside the M8 to the east of Glasgow.

After being dipped in 220 tonnes of molten zinc, Hamish then went through a process known as colour powder coating before being put in place.

'Wanderer'

Highland is the only company in Scotland that has the facilities to coat Hamish in this way.

Paul McCafferty, sales director of Highland, said: "We've been looking after Hamish at our head office for a number of years now, but we felt it was about time that he was spruced up and given a new lease of life.

"It's a great piece of sculpture and it's only right that others are allowed to enjoy and appreciate him."

Mr McCafferty added: "The M8 has become renowned for its art installations and the management team at the Pyramids Business Park was only too happy to allow Hamish to graze there for a while.

"He's a bit of a wanderer so I'm not sure how long he'll stay at the Pyramids for and I wouldn't be surprised if he popped up somewhere else in the near future."


SEE ALSO
Motorway to close for new bridge
02 Oct 08 |  Scotland
Horses inspire landmark sculpture
01 Jul 08 |  Tayside and Central
Harthill bridge design unveiled
02 Aug 06 |  Glasgow, Lanarkshire and West

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