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Tuesday, 11 June, 2002, 06:45 GMT 07:45 UK
Hospital to lose acute services
Dr Maurice Hayes presents the report
The Hayes Review recommended the proposal
Life-saving emergency and surgical services at Tyrone County hospital are to be lost following proposals by the Department of Health.

The proposal to strip the hospital in Omagh of its acute facilities is contained in a consultation document due to be issued on Wednesday

Last year, when the Hayes team reported on acute hospitals they said a new hospital should be built in Enniskillen and that acute services in Omagh should be withdrawn.

Wednesday's report is expected to accept that finding.

Bairbre de Brun: Views taken on board
Bairbre de Brun: Minister for Health

In 1996, Northern Ireland had 19 acute hospitals which had full accident and emergency units and the facilities to carry out life-saving surgery.

In the years since then there have been a series of reports from the Department of Health and from the health boards, all recommending the number should be cut.

In that time four acute hospitals have closed - Ards, Banbridge, South Tyrone in Dungannon, which was supposedly a temporary measure, and the Route in Ballymoney which shut when the new Causeway hospital opened at Coleraine.

Wednesday's report is also expected to agree with the Hayes suggestion for the downgrading of a number of other hospitals.

The Department of Health is expected to emphasise that these hospitals will continue to provide a range of services for their local populations, such as diagnostic tests, out-patient clinics and accident and emergency departments.

However, in many places these will be run by nurses instead of doctors.

 WATCH/LISTEN
 ON THIS STORY
BBC NI's health correspondent Dot Kirby:
"Nobody knows where the extra money is going to come from"
BBC NI's health correspondent Dot Kirby:
"Since 1996 four acute hospitals have closed"

AUDIO/VIDEO AUDIO/VIDEO
Health plan
Dr Maurice Hayes explains report's proposals
AUDIO/VIDEO  real 14k
See also:

20 Jun 01 | N Ireland
20 Jun 01 | N Ireland
31 Jul 00 | N Ireland
31 Jul 00 | N Ireland
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