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Tuesday, 26 November, 2002, 12:07 GMT
Female binge-drinking concerns
Students drinking in university bar (BBC)
Students drinking in a university bar
Young British women are living up to their "ladette" image by drinking until they drop, a survey confirms.

Almost half of women questioned by Company magazine admitted getting so drunk they had no recollection of getting home the night before.


Fortunately it is easy to prevent contributing to these alarming statistics

Sam Baker, Company magazine
One in 10 had become so inebriated they had fallen unconscious, while a third confessed to unprotected sex through drink.

The figures come from a survey of 1,000 women aged between 16 and 34 by Company magazine.

The magazine warns women risk health problems, assault and rape by indulging in drunken behaviour.

"Young women should be able to go out and enjoy themselves and a drink whenever they like and fortunately it is easy to prevent contributing to these alarming statistics," said editor Sam Baker.

"With a few simple preparations; cab numbers for example or a plan to alternate water and wine anyone can have a fantastic night out knowing that they'll be safe and healthy at the end of it!"

Health dangers

Statistics show that UK women are drinking more often and more heavily than ever before.

The average alcohol intake has increased from about seven grams to eight grams per day in the last decade - but the rise has been greater among young women.

Among women aged between 16 and 24, the proportion drinking more than three drinks per day has doubled from 9% to 18%.

A host of health dangers have been linked with heavy drinking.

Researchers revealed recently that drinking alcohol increases a woman's risk of developing breast cancer.

According to Andrew Varley of the research charity, the Institute of Alcohol Studies, there are physiological reasons why women are particularly at risk from excessive drinking.

"It is a matter of medical fact that more harm is in store for women who drink abusively than men," he told BBC News Online.

See also:

11 Dec 01 | Health
14 Aug 00 | Health
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