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Last Updated: Wednesday, 6 June 2007, 09:00 GMT 10:00 UK
Officers plied inmate with drink
Merseyside Police headquarters
The detectives had served for more than 20 years each
Two Merseyside police officers have lost their jobs for taking a prolific offender out of prison to try to clear up unsolved crimes.

The convict was even plied with drink in an attempt to get him to admit to unsolved offences.

The detective constables faced charges relating to their honesty and general conduct.

The charges stem from incidents when the inmate was taken to a girlfriend and when he was given alcohol.

A third officer has been disciplined as part of the investigation.

The two detectives were "required to resign" following the investigation which was supervised by the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC).

Taking a criminal on a domestic visit or buying him alcohol ... in the belief that he will admit to unsolved crimes can only be perceived as an inducement
Mike Franklin
IPCC

One of the men, who has 20 years of service as a police officer, faced nine charges of which he admitted to three. Four more were proven and two others were not proven.

The second man, who has 25 years of service, faced six charges of which he admitted one. Three were proven and two were not proven.

Mike Franklin, IPCC Commissioner for the North West, said: "This has been a very complex and difficult investigation.

"These officers have abused their position of authority and breached recognised practices and procedures.

"Taking a criminal on a domestic visit or buying him alcohol whilst driving him round in the belief that he will admit to unsolved crimes can only be perceived as an inducement.

"There is also evidence which suggests the officers may have primed the criminal to admit to offences that they had reason to believe he had not committed.

"That is totally unacceptable and undermines all the good work done by the honest, decent officers within Merseyside Police."


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