Page last updated at 14:13 GMT, Tuesday, 17 June 2008 15:13 UK

Tighter dresscode at Royal Ascot

Racegoer
A woman in an elaborate hat arrives for the first day of Royal Ascot

Female racegoers have been reminded of the definition of "formal day dress" at the annual Royal Ascot race meeting.

Following confusion last year, the Royal Enclosure at the Berkshire race course has reissued its strict admittance policy.

Off the shoulder, halter neck, spaghetti straps, straps of less than 1in (2.5cm) and miniskirts are "unsuitable", as are streaky fake tans.

For the first time, the prize money for the jockeys over the five days is 4m.

Tens of thousands of racegoers gathered for the first day of the meet on Tuesday including The Queen and members of the Royal Family in horse-drawn carriages.

In parts of the course the dress code is more relaxed but still demands formal wear.

But in the Royal Enclosure, women have been reminded that midriffs must be covered and "trouser suits must be full length and of matching material and colour".

Royal Ascot racegoers
Many women like to make fashion statements during the five-day meet

For men morning dress including waistcoat and top hat is the only permitted attire for the top-level of enclosure at the course.

As scouts from modelling agencies look out for the new face of the racecourse, some 170,000 bottles of champagne will be consumed along with 10,000 lobsters, 5,000 oysters and 18,000 punnets of strawberries.

Thames Valley Police will be implementing a one-way traffic system around the racecourse at certain times and said they would be clamping down on ticket touts.

Charles Barnett, chief executive officer for Ascot Racecourse, said: "We are particularly conscious of the problems caused by ticket touts and have put in place, with British Transport Police, a system whereby racegoers en-route and arriving in Ascot are warned of the dangers."

British Transport Police urged racegoers to use trains where possible.




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